WELCOME to HAPPY TO BE...This is a blog about my love of Antiques, My family, humor, as humor keeps us laughing and my every Day life...I hope you enjoy your visit...Please leave me a comment to let me know you Came by so I can visit with you Thank You !!...Hugs and Smiles, Gl♥ria

February 7, 2010

~SAY CHEESE~

Hello guys, I know you thought Oh boy she sick so she won't be boring us any more with her dumb Antiques anymore...Right??? Well your Wrong....I wanted to show you just a few of my olden photo things I have....Now I have allot of pictures here so you may want to grab a cup of coffee so I don't put you to sleep...ha ha!! This is one of my photo albums from ca. 1900 and it's also one of my favorite ones.... Love the tin mirror its velvet and leather





You see this has a little built in desk in the back.... Were they not clever in the olden days...









Even has a inkwell and a place to put your pen




A place to put all your photos until you wrote on them



I have 11 of these olden photo albums...One even plays music





One of my olden camera's










Kodak Premo box camera...don't you love the little plunger button on it....
These are a few of my tin type pictures...this one is from the civil war...






And look at the beautiful case it on....






Tintypes were a cheap and simple way of producing photographs using wet collodion on thin black painted sheet iron (not tin). Fast and easy to produce, they needed no special care and could be put into brooches, lockets and paper mounts as well as more traditional cases or frames. The metal plate was coated with collodion, sensitised with silver nitrate and then exposed for less than the time to produce a proper negative. A short development, fix and brief wash were then given, and the plate dried quickly as the metal did not absorb water. The tintype was an almost instant process, ideal for local and itinerant street photographers. Tintype photographers could still be found in remote areas of some countries at the end of the 20th Century. The interest in most tintypes is sociological, as they covered a much wider range of society than more expensive photographic methods such as the ambrotype or albumen print. The six plate tintype being approximately 2½"x3½" was just a little short of the standard carte size of 2½"x4¼" so it could in fact be inserted directly into an album carte slot without requiring a mount.




Now these are glass negatives sorry about the poor picture quality of them but it was so hard trying to take a picture of these...I finally had to sit them in my kitchen window....These are from Moscow Red square....The Red square was built in the 15th century under the ruling of Ivan 111....



In 1864 W. B. Bolton and B. J. Sayce published an idea for a process which would come to revolutionize photography. They suggested that sensitive silver salts be formed in a liquid collodion, rather than being precipitated, in-situ, on the surface of a plate. A light-sensitive plate could then be prepared by simply flowing this emulsion across the surface of a glass plate; no silver nitrate bath would be required.
This idea was soon brought to fruition. First, a printing emulsion was developed using silver chloride. These emulsions were slow, and could not be developed, so they were mostly used for positive printing. Shortly later, silver iodide and silver bromide emulsions were produced. These proved to be significantly faster, and the image could be brought out by development.
The emulsions also had the advantage that they could be washed. In the wet collodion process, silver nitrate would react with a halide salt; potassium iodide, for example. This would result in a double replacement reaction. The silver and iodine ions in solution would react, forming silver iodide on the collodion film. However, at the same time, potassium nitrate would also be formed by the potassium ions from the iodide and the nitrate ions from the silver. This salt could not be removed in the wet process. However, with the emulsion process, it could be washed out after creation of the emulsion.
The speed of the emulsion process was unremarkable. It was not as fast as the ordinary wet process, but was not nearly as slow as the dry plate processes. Its chief advantage was that each plate would behave the same way; the inconsistencies observed in the ordinary process were rare.


St.Basil Cathedral....Oh these pictures so remind me of the Movie Doctor Zhivago




Look how clear their faces are....


These were taken during the Regin of Emperor Nicholas 11 ca. 1894....I keep all of these wrapped up in acid free paper in boxes and in a dark place to store....



This is one of the boxes from Moscow that I found them in....One day I will show you the ones I have from the United States from the 1910 with the olden cars in them...I hope I didn't bore you too much again today...But girls you know how I love Antiques and like I have told you I do have a collection of just about everything and I love to find odd things....OK Girl's that was your Photo History 101 for today ha ha!!
So until next time from my mountain top to yours,



30 comments:

Justine said...

Now this was really super cool, Gloria! So when you bought all those different frames, they came with pictures in them, or you bought those separately? Wow.

Justine :o )

Deborah said...

Hi Gloria!
I am sorry you felt sick. I hope you feel better soon. I read back in your posts to see what was wrong...I have had oral surgery and I know it can be very painful.
I loved the guys you showed, very funny :)
I would also NEVER get sick of looking at your antiques :)
xxoo
Deborah

onlymehere said...

I'm sending my daughter, the photographer over. She'll love your cameras and other things here! You do have the most amazing stuff!

xinex said...

Gloria, your collection always amazes me. They are just so neat....Christine

The Muse said...

Gloria! i read your post 2x! LOL
i feel as though i step back in time...you engage me always when i visit you....

As i have said..opening your doors to us, is so very kind!

Karen said...

These pictures are fabulous!! More, more, more!!
Karen
Ladybug Creek

Wsprsweetly Of Cottages said...

Gloria! You have the prettiest and most unique things. You must have been collecting for years and years! I have an old box camera that my Mom used forever and too pictures of me from the time I was born.
Ok...that was great...so now where is the wicker doll buggy. I thought you had posted it but I can't find it and I wanted to see it.
If you already posted it, where can I find it? Hmmm? Sweetie pie, snooky ooky ookums? :)
Mona

Melissa Miller said...

~WOW Gloria! Those are some amazing treasures! The photo albums are really unique and gorgeous. Love the Dr Zhivago pictures the best. ~Pretty!

I hope you are feeling better theses past few days sweet friend.

~Melissa the NC daughter :)

Dawn said...

You DO collect everything don't you! This was really neat, learning about the old processes and seeing the really old camera's. Wouldn't the people in those photos be amazed that we can now take a photo with our tiny little cell phones, email them to our computer, and send them all over the world in seconds!

Thanks for sharing your "mom and chippendale's" story, it was so funny that we both had a story about it!
Hugs,
Dawn

Low Tide High Style said...

What a wonderful collection you have of photos, albums, and cameras! I've never heard of an album with music and I love the little heart mirror one. I also love old cameras. My great grandfather met my great grandmother because he was a photographer and he came to take her picture, so I love the history behind them!

Thanks so much for sharing your antiques. Thank you also for stopping by my blog.

Kat :)

shanesmoma said...

I just found your blog and LOVE it!! I love that you explain some of the antiques and give a mini history lesson to go. I think I'm going to have to go back and read your blog from beginnning to end!!

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

No room for antiques in our full-time life RVs! But I love looking at them, especially the old pictures and camera. Great stuff.

mishebe said...

Love the cover of that album. And you have a fabulous collection. Cool cameras. Also does your daughter have her own blog? I would like to see it if she does.. mishelle

mbkatc230 said...

Gloria, this is an amazing collection. I love the glass negatives, they do remind me of Dr. Zhivago. Thanks for the history of tin types - new and interesting information for me! I love visiting you. I never know what you're going to share but I always know it will be great! Hope you're feeling better. Hugs, Kathy

Rosie@Journey to Charm said...

I never saw old photo albums before. Aren't they just gorgeous? I love the little desk in the back. Clever. I can imagine a Victorian lady sitting at her writing desk, in her pretty long dress, writing on the back of a picture. Please do keep the history lessons coming. Rosie

Madeline's Album said...

Another great post. The old photos are wonderful. Thank you for once again letting us see more of your collection. Have a blessed day. Madeline

vignette design said...

Wow Gloria, that was so cool! I love your old vintage photos and album. Thanks for sharing your antiques and collections.

SmilingSally said...

Gloria, you have turned into a history teacher; how fascinating this post is. This reflects back to the days when letter writing was of prime importance. I enjoyed seeing your finds.

Glenda/MidSouth said...

What a pretty album. Don't think I have ever seen one with a desk built in. Thanks for sharing your info. also.

Sue (Someone's Mom) said...

I think you need to put a sign out front and charge admission to your house. It is really a museum of treasures.

I noticed in my post today that I got a shot of our antique salesman's sample icebox...take a look! It sits on our dresser.

Sue

Pink Roses and Teacups said...

Hi Gloria,

What a wonderful collection of antiques you have. Wow! I collect some cabinet pictures too of victorian women, and vintage children, and brides. Hope you are feeling better.

Debbie

salmagundi said...

Gloria-- You have the most marvelous things! Don't stop pulling them out to show us. We can learn so much from you. Sally

Rebecca said...

Be still my heart...gorgeous pictures...love the display. Beautiful my friend. Beautiful!

xoRebecca

The Quintessential Magpie said...

Gloria, this is ABSOLUTELY fascinating. I'm so impressed, and I think the glass negatives of Moscow are particularly fascinating since they were taken before the Russian Revolution!

I always learn something neat when you show your collections! THANKS!

Love you much and hope you're feeling better each day...

XO,

Sheila :-)

PAT said...

Your antiques are never boring, Gloria. I enjoyed this post very much!

Shelia said...

Hi Dear Gloria! Oh, this was a great post! I never tire of seeing your pretties and you have so many wonderful vintages! Hope you're feeling better! Take care of yoursself.
Be a sweetie,
Shelia ;)

bj said...

My goodness, young lady...is there anything antique that you don't collect? You have a fabulous collection of so many beautiful things.
This is an awesome collection!
xo bj

9405018--Pat said...

Wonderful post today...what a wonderful collections...Love the album cover...thanks for sharing...Pat H

Draffin Bears said...

Hi Gloria,

I adore all your old photos and the old camera is a beauty.
Love the Dr Zhivago like pictures.
I too love old photos and have a lot from my family.

Happy week
Hugs
Carolyn

Chari said...

Mornin' Sis...

Just wanted to come by and catch up with all that I've missed the last few days! Ohhh my gosh...I have never, ever...seen such exquisite photo albums or photos! You know, I've never actually seen any of these old, old albums...they are really beautiful, aren't they? I love the thick covers and how beautifully ornate they made them! Ohhh my gosh, I love the album that had the little desktop in it...I would have never dreamed they did such a thing with these albums! Sooo awesome!!! Of course, I would love to see your entire collection of pretty photo albums!!! Loved, loved, LOVED seeing the tin type and glass type photos! Girlfriend, I always learn so much from you! Like...I have always thought that the tin type photos were probably the expensive type! Now I know! They were really for the "everyday joe"...hehe! The tin type photo that you showed us of the civil war soldier...soooo fascinating! Ohhh...and I love that beautiful, ornate cover! But I have to tell you that I was most fascinated by the glass type photos! I never heard of them...they are sooo awesome!!! That photo taken in Russia is absolutely gorgeous! Wow...what a treasure! Hehe...it reminded me of Dr. Zivago too! I also enjoyed seeing those old, old cameras...sooo cool!!! My friend, you have the most fabulous collections and I just love how you're doing your blog about them and telling the history! It's so interesting and I sure am learning alot! I love, love, LOVE IT!!! Thank you so much for taking the time to photograph your collections and doing the history up on them for us! I sure do appreciate it! You're the best, Sis!!!

Love you honey...
Chari